November 14, 2017 by
Sartorially, we're in a phase where the concept of 'mix and match' is reigning supreme. Modern-day ensembles with a touch of vintage is all over (In a good way, of course), and is clearly having a major fashion moment. So, chin up and take things up a notch by infusing retro and Bohemia with a hint of casual chic. Need assistance to get it right without going over the top? Popular names from the city's fashion fraternity lay down the rules. Take note! “It’s a health mix that's making all the noise right now in the fashion scene. Oversized blazers are back, and throwing them over a well-fitted velvet outfit or pairing a crisp white dress shirt with a flared skirt are certainly winning combinations. While I’m all for playing around with modern and streaks of vintage; going minimal is the key to getting it right,” begins Aswathi Balakrishnan, a fashion influencer. Enthusing the need to keep fabrics and colour combinations in mind while putting together outfits, she adds, “Velvet is a very challenging fabric. You need to play with caution as the material is literally 'out there'. If you’re wearing a velvet bottom wear, stick to solid colours. If you're a tad experimental, make peace with a flowy velvety gown! And, it's always a good idea to team velvet outfits with neutral colours. That aside, linen culottes ( which is again a retro style) look amazing when worn with a laced top or a ruffled crop blouse.” The charming yet edgy vibe of the 70s drew inspiration from raging musical preferences back then. But, the obsession around some of the era's fashion hits are seeing a massive resurgence of late — in 2017. “A lively mash of midi dresses with a gypsy flair has always been a fashion favourite. But, matching it with casual outfits is the flavour of the season.The hippie and Boho fashion, which seeped into the scene back in the '60s but continued throughout the '70s is gaining momentum yet again. If you do not want to go all out with a vintage look, add a chic accouterment - suede belts, tassle earrings, or even a fitted leather jacket over a maxi dress. Works well for a balmy brunch date or a casual day at work,” suggests designer Nagashree Gururaj. Not ready to throw caution to the winds? Then stick to trusty monochrome says fashion blogger Anjalli Sukumaran. “The black and white combination never fails. The easiest way to pull off the look is by sporting a vintage midi skirt with an off shoulder top. Styling a midi skirt with a crop top is an overdone trend that could be replaced with a nice cutout top or a cold shoulder pastel top to add a twist to your outfit,” she states. Clearly, the modern minimalist with an edgy vibe ticks all the boxes this season. But, ensure you take the basics and comfort factor into consideration. “A blingy jumpsuit in the right size, worn with a beige fitted blazer is a safe buy. It's always a nice idea to begin with a basic and breezy look as it's important for the understated elegant charm to be reflected. That’s the appeal you should be channeling, if sporting vintage with a touch of casual chic is on your mind,” signs off Shruti Sarin, a lifestyle influencer.Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk/formal-dresses-uk | http://www.marieprom.co.uk/evening-dresses-uk

November 9, 2017 by
Jason Derulo has made his mark in the world with his music, songwriting and dancing. Now, he has entered the realm of fashion, with his new men’s clothing line, LVL XIII. Pronounced level thirteen, Derulo and designer Antonio Brown have come together to inspire the future of luxury with a unique fashion line that is the perfect balance of high fashion and streetwear. Rolling outcaught up with Derulo and Brown to learn more about the origin and concept of LVL XIII, and how Derulo’s music roots play a part in it. Where did the vision and inspiration of LVL XIII come from? Jason Derulo: It came from experimenting with the materials and interest we have. Like, what does my bathroom look like? What materials do I use in my bedroom? Just kind of bringing our interest into what the line is, and not just going from scratch. Talk about the fusion of streetwear and high fashion. JD: I think it was important to stay true to who we are. We are consumers of high fashion material. It was pretty easy to add the street element because we like that kind of clothing. Merging the two is the perfect blend. When I’m shopping, I [am] constantly looking for the nice balance between looking too dressy and looking too dressed down. What do you want to wear to a club when you want to be super fly but you don’t want to be in dress shoes or look like you’re going to a formal event? But you still want to be upscale. I think this line falls right in that space. Where you want to be a cut above but not too high fashion, where it’s not relatable. Recently, you said you want to have 100 businesses by 2019. Explain that. JD: For me, right now it’s been amazing because I’ve just been investing my money and my time into things I am passionate about. Though I want 100 businesses, it’s not a numbers game. I’m really just putting my time and energy into things I think are incredible, and both things I’m interested in myself. [Like] a gym I would want to go to, [the] food I would want to eat, a protein shake I would want to drink, a vodka I would want to drink. Investing in those kinds of things takes the pressure away from me because at the end of the day at least I can use them. How did technology and social media play a part in the creation of the line? JD: Social media is a part of everything that we’re doing. I’m not the biggest social media head on the planet, so I’m not going to sit here and act like I know everything about social media. But you have to get your product out to the people and people are online all the time. You just have to have a social media element to whatever brand you’re trying to do. Why is design so important to life? Antonio Brown: I think it’s so important to life because clothing has the ability to instill confidence and inspire people. That’s what we do through the brand and through the craftsmanship of the clothes that we create together. We design them to inspire people and to make them feel good and lift their spirits. You’re from Miramar, Florida, and of Haitian descent. How did that influence your music? JD: Musically, I guess you can’t escape your influences. It creeps itself into places where I didn’t necessarily intend it to. My accent will pop out of nowhere. A groove will pop out of nowhere. Or a rhythm will pop out of nowhere just because I was raised a certain way. I was raised in an ultra Haitian household and an ultra Haitian family. It’s not like my parents were super Americanized. My parents spoke Creole and French to me. I only learned French first, then I learned English later on. It’s a big part of my life, so, therefore, it just creeps into my music. At what point in your youth did you realize music would be a part of your life? JD: When I was 4 years old. I knew very early on what I wanted to do. I had a couple hiccups and phases where I thought I was going to be a basketball player. I thought I was going to be a doctor. But those things came and went very [quickly]. What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned working in the music industry? JD: The greatest lesson that I’ve learned is to be yourself. When I was coming out into this industry, I was very young. I was trying to find my way. When you’re young and trying to make it by any means necessary, you get lost in the sauce and I definitely did. At the end of the day, if you just remind yourself, it just makes life a lot easier. It makes life a lot more fun. [Now], I’m very comfortable in my skin.Read more at:prom dresses online | red carpet dresses

October 28, 2017 by
Swati Rai Twenty five springs after her entry into the fashion world, Payal Jain wants to rediscover herself — according to the times she is in and the person she has come to be. No, it isn’t a coincidence that her latest collection, ‘Forbidden Love’, which was showcased at the FDCI Amazon India Fashion Week Spring/Summer ’18, was all about ‘letting go’. Payal says the talk around fashion has dramatically changed in all these years. “We are living in the age of social media and of fashion influencers, where I still feel ill at ease. However, I do recognise its importance. The premium placed on having a showstopper five years ago has petered off now. To be fair, there’s more to the show than just the ambient and attendant factors — the music, the lights and so on.” The short attention span, memory and the need for instant gratification have altered the scene; luxury fashion is within the reach of the middle class, apart from the fast moving ones, retailed online and made available no sooner than the ramp show is over. The chatter around street style has also increased the eyeballs that the designers’ clothes get off the ramp. Payal calls it democratisation of fashion. “I am open to retailing online as that is the future. In fact, we get a lot of online queries for what people see on Instagram and other such social media.” Not the one to just give lip service to social media hashtags and buzzwords like ‘handloom’ and ‘Made in India’, Payal says, “I wish there was more focus on the weavers.” Making light of her continued association with some villages and their weavers, with whom she creates fabrics and patterns, Payal urges designers to give back to the community behind the scenes and support the craftsmen at the grassroots level. Payal trained in the craft of designing, graduated summa-cum-laude from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, San Francisco, California, and is a firm believer in the science of fashion. Art and creativity is intrinsic, she feels, but “there’s no running away from learning about patterns, textures, cutting and draping of the cloth to come out with that perfect garment.” Her design sensibility is a marriage of a western outlook with Indian ethos. Payal, who says less is more for her, loves fluid and clean lines in classy couture and prêt. Her latest collection, she says, is her most innovative and boldest ever. “If you don’t experiment, you become obsolete and jaded,” she says. So, over the last two years, she has played with colours and textures and mixed patterns and designs to her own surprise too. In an age when life is looked through many ‘filters’, her signature design leitmotif is ‘keeping it simple’ and she describes her brand ethos as having ‘a western body with an Indian soul’. This is exactly what she wants her collections to say too. Talking about her latest collection, her most vibrant yet, she shares, ‘The soul of this collection lies in its random, unexpected, bohemian aesthetic. I have allowed myself to wander wherever my imagination took me. I cannot define specific colours, silhouettes, fabrics, embroideries as I have not followed any of those norms or direction.”Read more at:http://www.marieprom.co.uk